Sam Houston's Quest | A Brown Bag Lecture

@ East Tennessee History Center
Where: 
East Tennessee History Center
When: 
Monday, February 18, 2019 - 11:45am to 1:30pm

Join the East Tennessee Historical Society on Monday, February 18, for a special Brown Bag lecture and book signing as the family team of Dr. Robin Montgomery and daughter Joy Montgomery present a program about Sam Houston, his life, his interaction with the Cherokee, and his role as an image of unity throughout the early 19th century.

Sam Houston holds the distinction of having served as the first president of the Republic of Texas and was one of the first two individuals to represent Texas in the United States Senate. He is the only person to have served as the governor of two different states—Texas and Tennessee. As a teenager, he ran away from home and lived with the Cherokee.

The Montgomery’s recently facilitated exchange trips between the three spots prominent in the life of Houston: Texas, East Tennessee, and Cherokee sites in Tennessee. Troy Wayne Poteete, chief justice of the Cherokee Supreme Court, represented the Cherokee Nation.

The program will begin at 11:45 a.m. at the East Tennessee History Center with Joy Montgomery speaking on Sam Houston and the Cherokee, followed by a short break, and then Dr. Robin Montgomery speaking at 12:45 p.m. on Sam Houston as a symbol of unity.

Joy Montgomery holds an M.A. degree from Sam Houston State University and a B.A. in German.  She is secretary of the Tennessee Trail of Tears Association and of the Walker County Historical Commission in Texas and volunteers at Washington on the Brazos State Historic Site.  Her professional career includes work as a museum specialist at the Sequoyah Birthplace Museum and teaching positions in Germany, South Korea, and Kyrgyzstan, the latter as a member of the Peace Corps.

Robin Montgomery is a native of Conroe, Texas, and holds a Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma.  His professional background includes a career as professor at Southwestern Oklahoma State University, along with four years as professor of international relations for a graduate program Europe for U.S. Military Offices.  His extensive publications include political science and local history, professional articles, books, and newspaper columns. He has published extensively in political science and local history.

The program is sponsored by the Harriet Z. Albers Memorial Fund and is and free and open to the public. The lecture will begin at 11:45 a.m. at the East Tennessee History Center, 601 S. Gay Street, Knoxville. Guests are invited to bring a “Brown Bag” lunch and enjoy the lecture. Soft drinks will be available.  For more information on the lecture, exhibitions, or museum hours, call 865-215-8824 or visit the website at www.EastTNHistory.org.